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Macalyne Fristoe, PhD

Macalyne Fristoe, Ph.D., is professor emerita of audiology and speech sciences at Purdue University. She received her B.A., cum laude, from Vanderbilt University, where she was president of Mortar Board and a member of Phi Beta Kappa honorary society. She also earned her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Vanderbilt, where she served on the faculty of the Department of Psychology and the Department of Audiology and Speech.

She was a speech clinician at the East Tennessee Hearing and Speech Center and a speech clinician for the cerebral palsy program in the Nashville-Davidson County public schools. She was speech and hearing consultant to Vanderbilt Hospital and was assistant director of the speech clinic at the Bill Wilkerson Hearing and Speech Center.

At the University of Alabama in Birmingham, Dr. Fristoe held appointments in Communication Disorders, Medicine, and Dentistry and was director of the Language Intervention Study Project. She went to Purdue University to be director of the speech clinic, and later served as director of graduate programs in the Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, as well as associate department head.

Dr. Fristoe is a fellow of ASHA, the American Psychological Association [APA], and the American Association on Mental Retardation [AAMR]. She has been president of the CEC Division for Children with Communication Disorders and vice president of the Communication Disorders Division. She has been a reviewer for numerous publications and agencies.

Her professional interests include assessment, augmentative communication, communication development, and mental retardation and developmental disabilities. She has been advisor to many master's and doctoral program students. Her teaching activities have included phonetics, assessment, language development, language disorders, augmentative communication, autism, and issues in research. For many years she served on the advisory board for the Indiana Resource Center for Autism.

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