Always Learning
 
 
 
International Sites
Cart

  Change Community
  • Whole-Class Cogmed: Integrating The Reality That Typically Developing Students Have Been Found Consistently To Benefit From Cogmed Too

    Presenter: Peter C. Entwistle, PhD

    Some Cogmed studies have been conducted of children doing Cogmed simultaneously in small groups (Dunning, et al., 2013) or class-sized groups (Holmes & Gathercole, 2013). Dunning et al., 2013 used groups between 6 to 12 students who were identified by working memory deficits. Holmes & Gathercole (2013) published two distinct trials of Cogmed. The first trial was of a mixed ability group of 22 students who did Cogmed as a group. The second trial of children selected based upon low academic performance included one group of 12 and a second group of 13. Yet, a number of studies have been published of typically developing adults (12), children and adolescents (6) and preschoolers (3). This data suggests that typically children and adults benefit from completing Cogmed as do those with working memory deficits, attention deficits and learning difficulties. Recent changes also make using Cogmed at the class level with mixed ability students feasible. The new Cogmed Trends reporting feature provides data at varying levels: district, school, class and individual child. Also, automated short start-up session videos allow a Cogmed coach to start several students at the same time and then answer any questions as a group after they watch the videos. In total the research and the improved features of Cogmed make whole-class Cogmed achievable.

    Date: Mar 11, 2016 - Time: 12:00 PM CST

    pdf PDF: Whole-Class Cogmed: Integrating The Reality That Typically Developing Students Have Been Found Consistently To Benefit From Cogmed Too

    link Video: Whole-Class Cogmed: Integrating The Reality That Typically Developing Students Have Been Found Consistently To Benefit From Cogmed Too