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Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children®-Fifth Edition
(WISC®-V)

 

Overview: Measure a child's intellectual ability. Discover the Power of V: WISCV.com

Age Range: Children aged 6:0–16:11

Administration: Paper-and-pencil or digital

Completion Time: Core subtests: ~60 minutes

Scores/Interpretation: FSIQ, Primary Index Scores and Ancillary Index Scores

Scoring Options: Q-interactive® Web-based Administration and Scoring, Q-global™ Scoring & Reporting or Manual Scoring

 
 
 

Product Details

Introducing the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children®–Fifth Edition, the latest version of the most proven trusted cognitive ability measure ever. Available in both a paper-and-pencil format and a digital format on Q-interactive®, the WISC–V delivers more flexibility and more content. It has been redesigned to give you a truly comprehensive picture of a child's abilities and it includes notable improvements to make identifying the issues—and finding the solutions—faster and easier, without sacrificing the Wechsler gold standard of excellence.

 

Content & Administration

The WISC–V gives you flexibility and interpretive power, along with access to more subtests, so you get a broader view of a child's cognitive abilities. New subtests are targeted to common referral questions for children such as the presence of a specific learning disability; and special clinical situations such as evaluations of children who are English language learners. An expanded factor structure provides new and separate visual spatial and fluid reasoning composites for all ages.

New Primary Subtests

Three new primary subtests extend the content coverage of the WISC-V and increase its practical application.

  • Visual Puzzles is a new Visual Spatial subtest that measures the ability to analyze and synthesize information
  • Figure Weights is a new Fluid Reasoning subtest that measures quantitative reasoning and induction
  • Picture Span is a new Working Memory subtest that measures visual working memory

New Complementary Subtests

Five new complementary subtest have been added to assess cognitive processes important to academic achievement in reading, math and writing, and have shown sensitivity to specific learning disabilities and other clinical conditions. These subtests include a measure of naming facility (Naming Speed and Naming Quantity) and visual-verbal associative memory (Immediate, Delayed and Recognition Symbol Translation).

Expanded and Updated Factor Structure

The test structure includes new and separate visual spatial and fluid reasoning composites for greater interpretive clarity and a variety of levels of composites for interpretive options.

Primary Index Scales include:

  • Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI)
  • Visual Spatial Index (VSI)
  • Working Memory Index (WMI)
  • Fluid Reasoning Index (FRI)
  • Processing Speed Index (PSI)

Ancillary Index Scales include:

  • Quantitative Reasoning Index (QRI)
  • Auditory Working Memory Index (AWMI)
  • Nonverbal Index (NVI)
  • General Ability Index (GAI)
  • Cognitive Proficiency Index (CPI)

Complementary Index Scales include:

  • Naming Speed Index (NSI)
  • Symbol Translation Index (STI)
  • Storage and Retrieval Index (SRI)

WISC-V Framework

Features & Benefits

More efficient and user-friendly

The WISC–V increases construct coverage without increasing testing time. So, you get a more efficient, developmentally appropriate measure– and still have time to assess other domains of interest.

  • Efficiently produce all primary index scores
  • Significantly reduced testing time to obtain the FSIQ
  • Simplified instructions with reduced vocabulary level, shorter discontinue rules, and refined scoring criteria
  • Five primary index scores, the FSIQ as well as three of the five ancillary index scores can be obtained through the ten primary subtests

More interpretive power

  • WISC–V provides statistical links to two measures of academic achievement, the KTEA-3 and the WIAT–III, to support more flexible evaluation of specific learning disabilities and two major approaches to specific learning disability identification: pattern of strengths and weaknesses analyses and ability-achievement discrepancy analyses
  • Expanded score analysis approach highlights index- and subtest-level strength and weaknesses analyses
  • Separate visual spatial and fluid reasoning composite scores results in greater interpretive clarity
  • Selection of process scores has been greatly expanded to enhance the depth of interpretation and understanding of performance

Updated psychometric properties

  • Updated normative sample standardized on 2,200 children aged 6:0–16:11
  • Normative sample stratified to match current U.S. census data based on sex, race/ethnicity, parent education level, and geographic region for each age group
  • Strong subtest floors and ceilings facilitate accurate measurement at the extremes of cognitive ability
  • Comparable or improved reliability for subtest and composite scores

Updated studies

  • Updated special group studies
  • Updated validity studies with other measures including WISC–IV, WPPSI–IV, WAIS–IV, WIAT–III, KTEA-3, Vineland-II, and BASC-2
  • Expanded validity evidence for the Q-interactive version, including construct validity studies and equivalence of Q-interactive and paper/pencil formats, and special group studies to examine patterns of performance of children from frequently-tested populations

Users & Applications

School psychologists, clinical psychologists and neuropsychologists working in schools, clinics, hospitals, universities and forensics can use the WISC–V for diverse applications such as:

  • identifying intellectual disabilities,
  • identifying and diagnosing learning disabilities/disorders,
  • evaluating of cognitive processing strengths and weaknesses,
  • assessing for giftedness, and
  • assessing the impact of brain injuries

Scoring

Scoring and Reporting

WISC-V scoring options include: Q-global, real-time automated scoring on Q-interactive, or manual scoring

Q-global

In addition to manual scoring, WISC–V is available on Q-global™, Pearson's web-based scoring and reporting system.

Q-global offers:

  • 24/7 secure, web-based access
  • Portability: Q-global can be used on mobile devices such as a laptop or tablet
  • On-demand, reliable scoring and comprehensive reporting solutions

Two options for scoring and reporting the WISC-V are available on Q-global.

The first option is to pay-per-report. Customers who administer the WISC-V only a few times each year, or those who want the flexibility to pay only as the assessment is used, may prefer this option.

The second option is to select an "unlimited use" subscription, where one user of the WISC-V gets unlimited scoring and reporting for one, three, or five years depending on the selected term of the subscription. This may be a better option for customers who administer the WISC-V several times each year—and don't want to worry about keeping track of their report expenses.

WISC-V Reports available on Q-global:

Score Reports

  • Automatically converts total raw scores to subtest scaled scores
  • Automatically converts sums of scaled scores to composites scores, including the FSIQ and numerous index scores
  • Performs score comparisons at the index and subtest levels
  • Generates score reports with tables and graphs
  • Ability Achievement Discrepancy and PSW analyses available at no extra charge through the selected achievement report (WIAT-III or KTEA-3)

Sample Score Report

Interpretive Reports– Coming 2015

Q-interactive

For Q-interactive users, WISC-V scoring and reporting includes real-time scoring and immediate access to results and the same report types available on Q-global.

Resources

Materials

WISC-V Brochure

Manual Supplement

WISC-V Technical and Interpretive Manual Supplement
View this supplement for the results of the WISC-V clinical validity studies with other measures and additional tables

Technical Reports

WISC-V Digital Equivalence

WISC-V Technical Report #1: Digital Clinical Validity Studies (ID and GT) - Coming Soon

Training

  • FREE Online Introductory Training is available exclusively to WISC-V users (WISC-V paper-and-pencil format or WISC-V digital format on Q-interactive)!

    Orientation Training Series

    These brief, pre-recorded sessions have been developed to familiarize you with the WISC-V. All you need is access to the Internet and the sound enabled on your computer. Please keep in mind that the session may take a few minutes to load.

    WISC-V Overview

    WISC-V Digital Overview

     

Upcoming Webinars

  • Unleashing the Power of the WISC-V

    Presenter: Amy Dilworth Gabel, PhD Training and Client Consultation Director, Pearson Clinical Assessment

    This session provides essential information to practitioners wishing to learn more about the use and interpretation of the Wechsler intelligence Scale for Children – Fifth Edition (WISC-V). This session will take a deeper dive into how to use the WISC-V results to inform clinicians, parents, and educators about how a student’s cognitive needs and strengths impact learning and other daily activities. Content is intended for those practitioners who routinely assess students between the ages of 6 and 16 for the provision of special services, and have administered the WISC-V. During the presentation, participants will gain practical information to help them in using the WISC-V as part of a comprehensive evaluation. Particular emphasis will be placed on the new components of the WISC-V, such as new subtests, index, and ancillary scores.

    Digital or Paper- You Now Have a Choice!

    This session is applicable whether you choose to use WISC-V in traditional paper and pencil format or on Q-interactive. If you are looking for a more detailed description of Q-interactive and WISC-V, we encourage you to attend a recorded session regarding the WISC-V on Q-interactive, or a Q-interactive Overview webinar.

    Date: Dec 16, 2014  Time: 12:00 PM EST  Register Now

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Past Webinars

  • Are you Ready? Using the new WISC-V

    Presenter: Amy Dilworth Gabel, PhD Training and Client Consultation Director, Pearson Clinical Assessment

    This session is designed will provide essential information to practitioners as they familiarize themselves with the Wechsler intelligence Scale for Children – Fifth Edition (WISC-V). The focus of the session will be to take a deeper dive into how the revisions to the Scale better inform clinicians, parents, and educators about how a student’s cognitive needs and strengths impact learning and other daily activities. Content is intended for those practitioners who routinely assess students between the ages of 6 and 16 for the provision of special services, and have attended one of the live or recorded introductory sessions. During the presentation, participants will gain practical information to help them in using the WISC-V as part of a comprehensive evaluation. Particular emphasis will be placed on the new components of the WISC-V, such as new subtests, index, and ancillary scores.

    Digital or Paper- You Now Have a Choice!

    This session is applicable whether you choose to use WISC-V in traditional paper and pencil format or on Q-interactive. If you are looking for a more detailed description of Q-interactive and WISC-V, we encourage you to attend a recorded session regarding the WISC-V on Q-interactive, or a Q-interactive Overview webinar.

    Date: Oct 20, 2014

    pdf PDF: Are you Ready? Using the new WISC-V

    swf Video: Are you Ready? Using the new WISC-V

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  • Preparing for WISC-V: Essential Information

    Presenter: Amy Dilworth Gabel, PhD

    This session is designed to go somewhat beyond the overviews of the Wechsler intelligence Scale for Children – Fifth Edition (WISC-V) that have been previously presented. The focus of this session will be to take a deeper dive into how the revisions to the Scale better inform clinicians, parents, and educators about how a student’s cognitive needs and strengths impact learning and other daily activities. Content is intended for those practitioners who routinely assess students between the ages of 6 and 16 for the provision of special services, and have attended one of the live or recorded introductory sessions. During the presentation, participants gain information to help them in using the WISC-V to understand student needs. Particular emphasis will be placed on the new components of the WISC-V, such as new subtests, index, and ancillary scores.

    Digital or Paper- You Now Have a Choice!
    This session is applicable whether you choose to use WISC-V in traditional paper and pencil format or on Q-interactive. If you are looking for a more detailed description of Q-interactive and WISC-V, we encourage you to attend a recorded session regarding the WISC-V on Q-interactive, or a Q-interactive Overview webinar

    Date: Sep 16, 2014

    pdf PDF: Preparing for WISC-V: Essential Information

    swf Video: Preparing for WISC-V: Essential Information

    Print
    Email
     
  • Preparing for WISC-V: Essential Information

    Presenter: Amy Dilworth Gabel, PhD

    This session is designed to go somewhat beyond the overviews of the Wechsler intelligence Scale for Children – Fifth Edition (WISC-V) that have been previously presented. The focus of this session will be to take a deeper dive into how the revisions to the Scale better inform clinicians, parents, and educators about how a student’s cognitive needs and strengths impact learning and other daily activities. Content is intended for those practitioners who routinely assess students between the ages of 6 and 16 for the provision of special services, and have attended one of the live or recorded introductory sessions. During the presentation, participants gain information to help them in using the WISC-V to understand student needs. Particular emphasis will be placed on the new components of the WISC-V, such as new subtests, index, and ancillary scores.

    Digital or Paper- You Now Have a Choice!
    This session is applicable whether you choose to use WISC-V in traditional paper and pencil format or on Q-interactive. If you are looking for a more detailed description of Q-interactive and WISC-V, we encourage you to attend a recorded session regarding the WISC-V on Q-interactive, or a Q-interactive Overview webinar

    Date: Aug 21, 2014

    pdf PDF: Preparing for WISC-V: Essential Information

    swf Video: Preparing for WISC-V: Essential Information

    Print
    Email
     
 

FAQs

Questions

Frequently asked questions follow. Click on a question to see the response.

Q-interactive

  • Frequently Asked Questions

    For general Q-interactive FAQs, click here

Test Framework, Revision Goals, and General Practice Issues

  • How has the test structure changed?

    Changes in the test structure include new and separate Visual Spatial and Fluid Reasoning index scores and new measures of visual spatial ability, quantitative fluid reasoning, visual working memory, rapid automatized naming/naming facility, and visual-verbal associative memory. To augment the primary index scores and the FSIQ, a number of new ancillary and complementary index scores are also available, such as quantitative reasoning, auditory working memory, naming speed, symbol translation (i.e., visual-verbal associative memory), and storage and retrieval index scores. The changes were influenced by contemporary structural models of intelligence, neurodevelopmental theory and neurocognitive research, clinical utility and factor-analytic studies.

    The separation of Visual Spatial and Fluid Reasoning index scores results in greater interpretive clarity. The addition of visual working memory enhances the scale’s clinical utility due to domain-specific differentiation of working memory abilities. The new naming facility and visual-verbal associative memory measures are related to achievement and sensitive to specific learning disabilities and a wide variety of other clinical conditions. These measures are useful in a pattern of strengths and weaknesses approach to specific learning disability identification.

  • Was the WISC–V designed to line up with Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory?

    Theory was not the only consideration that influenced the development of the WISC–V, and no single theory determined its structure. Neurodevelopmental research and clinical utility were also important considerations when determining the WISC–V test structure. However, the WISC–V model reflects contemporary structural intelligence theories, such as CHC, and defensible theoretical perspectives and frameworks, including CHC theory, can be utilized in its interpretation.

    Widely accepted structural intelligence models based on factor analytic results, such as CHC theory, provide overwhelming evidence for general intelligence at the top of a hierarchical model and for various related and distinguishable broad abilities at the level beneath. In some models, the specific abilities are each composed of various narrow abilities at the lowest level. Although evidence from structural models does not identically converge, most indicate that verbal comprehension, visual spatial, fluid reasoning, working memory, and processing speed abilities are among the important components, and these are the five primary index scores available for the WISC–V. The names of these factors vary, based on the taxonomy system used by a team of investigators; the CHC taxonomy provides names for these constructs (i.e., Gc, Gv, Gf, Gsm, and Gs, respectively). The Wechsler intelligence scales have evolved in response to these consistently observed factors, and the WISC–V continues this work by providing new measures of working memory and a new working memory composite, offering separate visual spatial and fluid reasoning composites, and improving upon the measure of verbal comprehension and processing speed while continuing to offer composite scores for each. The WISC–V also includes a storage and retrieval index (SRI) that is analogous to Glr in the CHC taxonomy. When used together with an achievement measure, such as the WIAT–III or the KTEA–3, a number of other constructs are also measured, including aspects of auditory processing (i.e., Ga) within CHC theory.

  • Is the WISC–V quicker to administer than the WISC–IV?

    Yes. Substantial efforts were made during development to achieve the shortest testing time possible and still offer greater construct coverage and flexibility. As a result, administration time is shorter than that of the WISC–IV. For the heart of the test, the primary index scores, the subtests take less time (about 10 minutes) to administer than the WISC–IV. The FSIQ can be obtained about 25–30 minutes faster than the WISC–IV. Because administration time is determined by the composite scores desired, it varies based on the practitioner’s choices. The WISC–V measures a number of other related constructs (e.g., rapid automatized naming, visual-verbal associative memory). If you opt to administer the measures related to these constructs, the testing time will somewhat longer.

  • Is there information in the WISC–V Technical and Interpretive Manual about the proportions of children with various clinical conditions that were included in the normative sample? Are norms available that do not include children from these special groups?

    As shown in Table 3.6 of the WISC–V Technical and Interpretive Manual, representative proportions of children from the special group studies were included in the normative sample. In addition to children with various clinical conditions, children with intellectual giftedness also were included to appropriately represent children with extremely high scores. The proportions of children from special group studies are low, and accurately reflect their presence in the U.S. population. It is unlikely the inclusion of very small proportions of children with disabilities in the normative sample will result in more children scoring within the normal range.

  • What are the recommendations for using the WISC–V over the WAIS–IV when evaluating examinees aged 16?

    Because the age ranges of the WISC–V and the WAIS–IV overlap for examinees aged 16, practitioners have the option of choosing the appropriate measure for an examinee this age. For examinees suspected of below average cognitive ability, the WISC–V should be administered because of its lower floor at this age range. For examinees of high ability, however, the WAIS–IV should be considered because of its higher ceiling. For the examinee of average ability, the choice between the WISC–V and the WAIS–IV requires clinical judgment from the educational and/or psychological professional. Both tests require the administration of 10 subtests to calculate the FSIQ and primary index scores, but examinees who have difficulty completing a lengthier assessment may benefit if the WISC–V is used because it is somewhat faster to obtain the primary index scores and the FSIQ. The WISC–V provides a Nonverbal Index that requires no expressive responses, which may be useful for examinees who are English language learners or who have expressive difficulties. The WISC–V provides some additional composite scores and more links to achievement tests that may be informative for certain referral questions (e.g., specific learning disability). The reasons for referral, familiarity with the tests, and knowledge of the examinee’s characteristics (e.g., attention span) should be taken into consideration.

  • How long do professionals have to transition from using the WISC–IV to using the WISC–V?

    Publications such as the current American Psychological Association (APA) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, and Assessment of Children: Cognitive Foundations provide guidance about the use of obsolete tests. Most practitioners make the move to the new edition within 8–12 months of the release. Consider your own practice situation and how critical the evaluations you conduct are when making the decision. For example, in cases where the older edition is used, and an independent educational evaluation is requested, a school system may be at a greater risk of having results called into question.

  • What is the appropriate composite score to use when evaluating for a specific learning disability using ability-achievement discrepancy analyses?

    The FSIQ is generally the first choice for an ability-achievement discrepancy analysis, because it provides the broadest sample of behavior. However, there may be other circumstances that influence your choice (e.g., significant discrepancies between index scores when a language disorder is suspected). In these situations, other scores might be appropriate (i.e., VCI, VSI, FRI, GAI, NVI).

  • Does the WISC–V support use of a pattern of strengths and weaknesses approach to learning disability evaluation?

    Yes, the WIAT–III and the KTEA–3 scoring reports on the Q-globalTM platform can be used to evaluate a specific learning disability, using a pattern of strengths and weaknesses discrepancy analysis approach. The data are too complex to provide in a paper format; the scoring software must be used for this purpose.

Subtests

  • Is teaching allowed on the sample items to ensure that children understand the expectations of the subtests?

    Yes, many of the subtests have demonstration, sample, and teaching items built in to ensure the child understands the task. These items were added in response to the needs of thousands of children who participated in the development of the scale. Children with special needs were included among these participants.

  • Why was Comprehension not chosen as a primary subtest? From a language perspective, it provides a richer sense of the child's ability to answer open-ended questions, a more authentic skill for real-life.

    In the online basic training that is included with each kit, we describe in more detail the types of analyses that were conducted to make the decisions regarding which subtests would be primary and which would be secondary. To summarize, the team looked at psychometric properties such as floors, ceilings, reliability, validity, and construct coverage; clinical utility; demographic differences; user-friendliness; and feedback from practitioners and customers. There is nothing that precludes administration of secondary subtests if a practitioner believes that useful information will be gathered for a particular child.

  • Why was Word Reasoning dropped?

    Word Reasoning was removed because of its construct overlap with Vocabulary, its lack of strong validity evidence as a fluid reasoning measure, and its high correlation with the Information subtest, which rendered it somewhat redundant psychometrically.

  • Did you consider removing the time bonuses for Block Design?

    If the time limits are removed, children who do not have the commensurate intellectual ability complete more items correctly. Removing the time bonuses on this subtest would result in a loss of the ceiling, greatly reduced reliability, and a much lower correlation with general intelligence. These issues greatly reduce the meaningfulness of scores that could be derived from the results. For practitioners who are interested in a score without time bonuses, a Block Design No Time Bonus (BDn) process score is available and can be compared with Block Design.

  • Why was Picture Completion dropped?

    Picture Completion was removed to decrease the emphasis on speed in the battery and to allow measurement of other constructs of interest (e.g., visual spatial ability, fluid reasoning, visual working memory, rapid automatized naming, visual-verbal associative memory).

  • How does Block Design work with children with motor deficits such as cerebral palsy? Is there an alternative test?

    Whether Block Design is appropriate depends on the severity of the motor impairment. Unless the child has severe motor impairment, they may be able to complete the task. You will need to evaluate the severity and impact of the motor impairment for each case. If Block Design cannot be administered, the Visual Puzzles subtest can be substituted to obtain the FSIQ. The VSI and some ancillary index scores may not be obtained in this situation.

  • How does interpretation of Arithmetic change now that it is classified as a Fluid Reasoning subtest?

    It would be inappropriate to interpret Arithmetic as a measure of only Fluid Reasoning or only Working Memory. That is why it does not contribute to any primary index score. Arithmetic hasn't changed—it measures what it has always measured. What has changed is the clarity with which it is understood. The visual-spatial emphasis of the PRI obscured Arithmetic's strong relationship with the fluid reasoning component of that scale. The new test structure means that Arithmetic may be more useful for hypothesis testing than as an indicator of a broad ability. Arithmetic has always been a highly g-loaded and factorially-complex subtest.

    Confirmatory factor analysis proceeds from theory. Based upon current theory, a 5-factor model, with Arithmetic loading on the Fluid Reasoning factor, was tested and provided a better fit. The factor loadings shift somewhat due to the new WISC–V subtests. The confirmatory factor analysis in the WISC–V Technical and Interpretive Manual demonstrates that models with Arithmetic loading on the Working Memory factor also had merit and provided a good fit. There is a new visual working memory subtest in the WISC–V, whereas all of the Working Memory subtests in prior versions were verbally presented. This may account for some portion of the shift, because Arithmetic is also verbally presented. When more fluid reasoning and visual spatial subtests and the new visual working memory subtest were present, the PRI split into the Visual Spatial factor and the Fluid Reasoning factor.

    WISC–V Arithmetic has a substantial cross loading on the Working Memory factor, but it has a slightly higher loading on the Fluid Reasoning factor. It also has a cross loading on the Verbal Comprehension factor. Neurocognitive research shows that fluid reasoning and working memory both involve the prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, a great deal of empirical literature supports that they are related abilities.

    With the new classification, interpretation at the subtest level could be presented in a more nuanced manner, rather than conceptualizing Arithmetic as a pure measure of a single ability. The WMI is intended to provide information about working memory ability, but the WISC–V subtests are thought to measure a number of different aspects of cognitive ability; they are not pure measures of the abilities represented by the factors on which they fall. Interpretation may vary depending on the particular examinee and will be nuanced based on the relationship among measures, response processes, and clinical information. For example, if the examinee has significant language problems, you are likely to see lowered scores on Arithmetic because of the impact of language comprehension on the test. If the examinee has significant deficits with math operations, that is, a math disability or low ability on measures of math computation, then low Arithmetic scores are likely associated with that problem. If the examinee has intact language and computational skills, low scores may be due to quantitative reasoning, that is, they don’t know how to solve math problems or how to figure out what steps or what calculations are needed. In these circumstances, Figure Weights could provide more information. As another example, if the patient has low working memory ability, then Arithmetic will be low because of problems manipulating information in working memory. Digit Span Backward and Digit Span Sequencing or Letter–Number Sequencing could provide some information to support this hypothesis.

    A number of articles have been published showing that the WISC–IV may be interpreted with the new 5-factor model, and Flanagan and Kaufman's Essentials of WISC–IV Assessment has several chapters that cover the interpretation of the Wechsler intelligence scales from this perspective. 

  • Are the Comprehension items updated?

    As part of any revision, items that may require revision are identified for various reasons (e.g., length of time in use, cultural shifts, wording, vocabulary level, relevance). There have been modifications to the Comprehension items to make them not only culturally relevant, but also more child-friendly. For example, more questions related to child-relevant content appear on the WISC–V, and no item contains the word “Advantages” any longer.

  • I tested a child aged (6, 7, or 8) and the Naming Speed Quantity score came out unusually high. Did I make a scoring error?

    Check to ensure you are in the NSQ column in the norms table in the WISC–V Administration and Scoring Manual Supplement. Some examiners mistakenly apply the column from the NSco, NSsco, or NSln process scores to their NSQ results and obtain unusually high scores as a result.

  • Are there out of level norms for children with low cognitive ability on Naming Speed Literacy (i.e., for those who don't know the names of all the letters and numbers)?

    Out of level norms are not provided, because the construct being measured by the task is changed if the child does not know the words. Do not administer this item if the child does not know letters and numbers. For children aged 7–8, it is still possible to obtain a process score on WISC–V Naming Speed Size-Color-Object without Naming Speed Letter-Number. WISC–V Naming Speed Quantity may also be administered in this situation, but the Naming Speed Index and the Storage and Retrieval Index cannot be obtained. For children aged 9–16 who do not know the names of letters or numbers, another object- or shape-naming task (e.g., from KTEA–3 or NEPSY–II) could be used as well.

  • How will color blindness be handled in the Naming Speed Literacy subtest?

    Individuals with color-perception differences are a group that encompasses greater than 10% of the general population. These issues are much more common in males. We have made every effort to ensure our items, including those on the WAIS–IV, WISC–V, WPPSI–IV, and WASI-II, are free of bias against these individuals. Items are reviewed by color-perception differences experts, as well as individuals with color-perception differences, during the early stages of the test development process. In addition, acetate overlays have been utilized so that the test developers can understand the appearance of the stimuli to individuals with various color-perception differences. Items are also copied in black and white to check appearance to those with monochromatic color perception. All items are also subjected to an electronic “color-blindness” simulator to check item appearance with every type of color-perception difference and ensure that the intensity and saturation of colors are not confused or result in different responses. For the WISC–V, the colors are yellow, blue, and red; green is not included. This means that for the most common color blindness (green/red, which is 7%-10% of boys), the children will be able to take it without a problem. Children with monochromacity (0.00001% of children) should not be administered the WISC–V Naming Speed Literacy items that involve colors; however, they could take Item 3 (Letter–Number) and the Naming Speed Quantity subtest  For children with deuteranopia (1%), the simulation, template, and expert review indicate that they should be able to see the differences between the yellow and blue.

Composite Scores

  • How is the WISC–V FSIQ different than the WISC–IV FSIQ?

    The WISC–V FSIQ and the WISC–IV FSIQ differ in some respects. The WISC–V FSIQ is based on seven subtests: Similarities, Vocabulary, Block Design, Matrix Reasoning, Figure Weights, Digit Span, and Coding. Compared with the WISC–IV FSIQ, the WISC–V FSIQ assigns a relatively lighter weight to working memory and processing speed abilities, as only one subtest from each of these domains are included. Therefore, somewhat less emphasis is placed on working memory and processing speed.

  • What is the fundamental difference between the FSIQ and the primary index scores?

    The FSIQ is usually considered the score that is most representative of general intellectual functioning (g). The primary index scores (e.g., VCI, VSI, WMI) represent intellectual functioning in specified cognitive areas (e.g., verbal comprehension, visual-spatial ability, working memory). The FSIQ is derived from a subset of the subtests that contribute to each primary index score.

  • If there are significant discrepancies between the primary index scores (e.g., VCI, WMI), is the FSIQ still interpretable (e.g., for diagnosing intellectual disability)?

    Research suggests that even when a cognitive ability composite score, such as the FSIQ, is based on disparate abilities, it still has predictive validity. Best practice suggests that you conduct a complete discrepancy analysis (looking at statistical and clinical significance of strengths and weaknesses) and conduct additional assessments (e.g., adaptive behavior, social and emotional functioning) to fully understand a child’s needs. There may be times where there are such statistically and clinically significant discrepancies in a child’s profile that the FSIQ does not represent a unitary construct; however, this does not render the  score invalid. Rather, the FSIQ may not tell you everything that you need to know to plan appropriately for a child. In most cases, abundant information regarding treatment needs can be gained from the various primary and ancillary index scores (and other information) available. You will also need to consider the child’s culture, language, and background and to consult your local guidelines for eligibility in making a determination.

  • What does the Fluid Reasoning Index (FRI) measure?

    The FRI measures the child’s ability to detect the underlying conceptual relationship among visual objects and to use reasoning to identify and apply rules. Identification and application of conceptual relationships in the FRI requires inductive and quantitative reasoning, broad visual intelligence, simultaneous processing, and abstract thinking. The subtest composition of the FRI differs from the WISC–IV PRI. Matrix Reasoning is the only common subtest, contributing to the FRI as well as the WISC–IV PRI. Block Design and Picture Concepts, which contributed to the WISC–IV PRI, are not included. Figure Weights, a new subtest on WISC–V, contributes to the FRI. Compared with the WISC–IV PRI, the WISC–V FRI emphasizes abstract conceptual reasoning more and construction abilities requiring visual-perceptual integration and visual-spatial reasoning less.

  • What does the Working Memory Index (WMI) measure?

    Contemporary research indicates that working memory is an essential component of other higher-order cognitive processes. The WMI measures the child’s ability to register, maintain, and manipulate visual and auditory information in conscious awareness. Registration requires attention, auditory and visual discrimination, and concentration. Maintenance is the process by which information is kept active in conscious awareness, using the phonological loop or visual sketchpad. Manipulation is mental resequencing of information based on the application of a specific rule. The subtest composition of the WMI differs from the WISC–IV WMI. Digit Span is the only common subtest, contributing to the WMI as well as the WISC–IV WMI. It has been substantially revised for the WISC–V to increase the working memory load by adding a new sequencing condition. Letter–Number Sequencing, which contributed to the WISC–IV WMI, has been replaced with Picture Span, a new visual working memory subtest in WISC–V. Compared with the WISC–IV WMI, the WISC–V WMI emphasizes visual working memory more and auditory working memory less.

  • What is the difference between primary index scores, ancillary index scores, and complementary index scores?

    The 13 index scores available on the WISC–V can be subdivided into three categories: primary, ancillary, and complementary. The five primary index scores are derived from administration of the 10 primary subtests, supported by factor analysis, and theoretically and clinically driven. They are recommended for a comprehensive evaluation of cognitive ability that includes the Verbal Comprehension Index, Visual Spatial Index, Fluid Reasoning Index, Working Memory Index, and Processing Speed Index. The ancillary index scores, including the Quantitative Reasoning Index, Auditory Working Memory Index, Nonverbal Index, General Ability Index, and Cognitive Proficiency Index, are derived from combinations of primary subtests or primary and secondary subtests, and they provide additional information regarding a child’s cognitive abilities and WISC–V performance. The complementary index scores are the Naming Speed Index, Symbol Translation Index, and Storage and Retrieval Index. They are derived from administration of the complementary subtests, and provide further information about other cognitive abilities that may be assessed if the clinical need is present. These tasks were developed to enhance the assessment of children with suspected learning disabilities and are not designed as measures of intellectual ability.

    The ancillary and complementary index scores are described below.

    Ancillary Index Scores

    Quantitative Reasoning Index (QRI) – The QRI is derived from the sum of scaled scores for the Figure Weights and Arithmetic subtests, and is an indicator of the child’s quantitative reasoning skills.

    Nonverbal Index (NVI) – Offers an estimate of overall ability for children using subtests that do not require any verbal responses. Due to the relatively reduced verbal demands of its contributing subtests, the NVI may offer a more appropriate estimate of overall ability than the FSIQ for children with expressive issues or with clinical conditions associated with expressive language issues (e.g., autism spectrum disorders) or who are English language learners.

    General Ability Index (GAI) – Provides an estimate of general ability that is less reliant on working memory and processing speed compared with the FSIQ.

    Cognitive Proficiency Index (CPI) – Provides an estimate of the efficiency with which cognitive information is processed in the service of learning, problem solving, and higher order reasoning.

    Complementary Index Scores

    Naming Speed Index (NSI) – Provides a broad estimate of the automaticity of basic naming ability, drawn from a variety of tasks.

    Symbol Translation Index (STI) – provides a broad estimate of visual-verbal associative memory, drawn from a variety of conditions.

    Storage and Retrieval Index (SRI) – provides a broad estimate of long-term storage and retrieval accuracy and fluency, derived from a variety of tasks designed to measure cognitive processes that are associated with reading, mathematics, and writing skills, and have shown sensitivity to specific learning disorders and other clinical conditions.

  • Is the NVI recommended for students with varying degrees of communication deficits? Could you use the NVI to determine eligibility for students who are nonverbal?

    The NVI may be especially useful in these types of situations. Refer to the special group studies in Chapter 5 and to the appropriate interpretive section in Chapter 6 of the WISC–V Technical and Interpretive Manual for more information. Ability-achievement discrepancy analyses, using the NVI with the WIAT–III and the KTEA–3, can be conducted using the tables in Appendix B of the WISC–V Technical and Interpretive Manual.

  • What is the difference between the FSIQ and the GAI?

    The GAI provides an estimate of general intellectual ability that is less impacted by working memory and processing speed than the FSIQ. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders associated with difficulties in working memory and processing speed, such as learning disabilities, ADHD, Language Disorder, or autism spectrum disorder, may obtain lower FSIQ scores than children without such difficulties. In these situations, the lower FSIQ score may mask meaningful differences between general cognitive ability (represented by the FSIQ) and other cognitive functions (e.g., achievement, memory, and specific neuropsychological functions). The GAI was developed to help practitioners with the identification of relative strengths and weaknesses that are based on comparisons between general ability and other cognitive functions. Compared with the FSIQ, the GAI provides the practitioner with an estimate of general intellectual ability that is less sensitive to the influence of working memory and processing speed by excluding those subtests. The FSIQ can be compared to the GAI to assess the effects of a weakness in cognitive proficiency (as measured by the working memory and processing speed subtests) on the child’s overall cognitive functioning. In some situations, it may be appropriate to use the GAI for score comparisons with measures of achievement or other cognitive functions. An evaluation of the significance and frequency of GAI–FSIQ differences may inform decisions about when to use the GAI in specific clinical situations.

  • Are there data for the gifted population and frequency of GAI minus CPI differences?

    There is not an analogous table that reports these data by special group. Table C.11 in the WISC–V Administration and Scoring Manual Supplement reports this information by total sample and by ability level. One portion of this table reports the information for children with GAI ≥ 120.

  • If I substitute a subtest when I derive the FSIQ, is it considered a standard administration?

    No. Because this procedure estimates performance on a primary subtest using a secondary subtest, the results should be interpreted with caution and considered non-standard.

  • Can I substitute a secondary subtest for a primary subtest when deriving the FSIQ?

    A maximum of one substitution may be made when deriving the FSIQ only. No substitutions can be made for any other composite score. The potential FSIQ substitutions are limited in order to constrain additional measurement error that may be introduced by this practice. Table 2.8 in the WISC–V Administration and Scoring Manual indicates allowable substitutions for deriving the FSIQ.

  • How was it decided that one subtest score could or could not be substituted for another when deriving the FSIQ?

    Because substituted subtests are being used as an estimate of performance on another subtest, only secondary subtests within the same cognitive domain that are highly related to the primary subtest can be substituted.

  • Can I administer all of the primary and secondary subtests and choose to use the highest subtest scaled scores when computing the FSIQ?

    No. When deriving the FSIQ, you can only substitute a secondary subtest for a primary subtest that is spoiled or invalidated, or for a specific clinical purpose. Secondary subtests can also provide additional information on cognitive functioning. If you need to substitute a secondary subtest in place of a primary subtest for deriving the FSIQ, it is best practice to decide this before you administer the subtest—not after you have derived scaled scores. Secondary subtests are also useful when the primary subtest scores that contribute to a primary index score are widely discrepant. In this situation, additional information from secondary subtests can help to shed light on factors that may contribute to such disparate results.

  • Why isn’t subtest substitution permitted on any of the index scores?

    Because subtest substitution may introduce measurement error into derived composite scores, substitution is limited. The index scores are derived from fewer subtests than the FSIQ, therefore, the risk of such error is greater. If a secondary subtest substitutes for a primary subtest for the FSIQ, the Q-globalTM scoring software will not allow calculation of the primary index score that the primary subtest contributes to.

  • Is score proration still available?

    Prorating is available for the FSIQ only. A maximum of one proration or substitution may be made when deriving the FSIQ. Proration and substitution may not be combined to derive an FSIQ.

Kit Materials

  • Why is there a WISC–V Administration and Scoring Manual Supplement? What is it for? Do I need to carry it with me?

    The supplement contains all tables needed to fill out the Ancillary and Complementary Analysis and Process Analysis pages of the Record Form. You do not need the supplement during administration. You will only need it during scoring and only if you wish to supplement the primary analysis using these other scores.

  • Do I need all three stimulus books?

    Stimulus Books 1 and 2 are necessary when administering the 10 primary subtests. Stimulus Book 3 is necessary when administering the complementary subtests.

Q-global Scoring and Reporting

  • What is Q-global?

    Q-global is a web-based scoring and reporting platform that offers accessibility from any computer connected to the Internet. It allows for quick and automatic organization of examinee information and the ability to generate scores and produce accurate and detailed results. Reports are available in a PDF or WORD document format. Go to http://www.helloq.com to sign up for a Q-global account.

  • When will the WISC–V score report and WISC–V interpretive report writer be available?

    The score report is available now on Q-global. The interpretive report generally becomes available approximately 6 months following the publication of a test.

  • Can I reprint a scoring report from Q-global at no charge?

    Yes. You can reprint a report at no charge if you change any demographic or report options. However, if you alter raw data, a new record is created and a new report usage is required to print the output.

  • How do you use subtest substitution and proration for the FSIQ when scoring the WISC–V in Q-global?

    A drop-down menu within the WISC–V Q-global scoring software facilitates subtest substitution. Choose your substitution in the drop-down menu.

    On rare occasions, an inadequate number of valid subtest scores are obtained to derive the FSIQ, despite the availability of secondary subtests. Q-global automatically prorates the FSIQ if a primary subtest that contributes to it is missing and a secondary subtest is not selected for substitution. If more than one primary subtest is missing, the FSIQ is not calculated. Proration is only available for the FSIQ and only when the prorated sum of scaled scores is based on primary subtests. You cannot combine subtest substitution and proration when deriving the FSIQ.

  • Are the allowable substitutions for primary subtests different on Q-global compared to hand scoring?

    The rules governing allowable substitutions for core subtests for Q-global and hand scoring (i.e., in the WISC–V Administration and Scoring Manual) are the same. Substitution should only be used when the primary subtest is missing or invalid or in certain clinical situations when it is determined that a secondary subtest is a better estimate of the cognitive ability than the primary subtest (e.g., when a child’s physical condition interferes with performance). Any substitution selected within Q-global is made on all applicable composites, and any score comparisons that utilize the substituted subtest are affected.

  • Why are some score comparisons not available on the Q-global platform if I substitute a secondary subtest for a primary subtest?

    The score comparisons are not available because the data they are based on require the missing subtest. For example, pairwise index-level difference comparisons that include the VCI are not provided in Q-global if Information is substituted for Vocabulary when deriving the FSIQ, because the VCI is not calculated.

    Some other comparisons may also be unavailable if substitution is used. For example, index-level strengths and weaknesses comparisons require calculation of the mean primary index score or the FSIQ. If the VCI is unavailable, the MIS cannot be calculated. In this situation, the FSIQ becomes the comparison score, and the other available primary index scores are compared with the FSIQ rather than the MIS.

  • Are score comparisons with the KTEA–3 and the WIAT–III available on Q-global?

    Yes. It is possible to either manually enter the WISC–V scores when creating a KTEA–3 or a WIAT–III score report or import scores from the WISC–V score report on Q-global.

  • What is included in the score report with the KTEA–3 and WIAT–III on Q-global?

    The report includes two analyses to aid in the identification of specific learning disabilities: the traditional ability-achievement discrepancy analysis and the pattern of strengths and weaknesses discrepancy analysis.

  • To use Q-global, do I need to purchase iPads or other tablets?

    Q-global is a web-based scoring and reporting system (with some online administration features for rating scales). Q-global can be used with any device you use to access the web; it does not require iPads. Administering the WISC–V on Q-interactive does require the purchase of two iPads. Scoring is included in the Q-interactive test administration using the tablets; no additional purchase is necessary.

  • Can you confirm if your Q-global program is compatible with Mac computers?

    Yes, you may use Q-global on Macs. 

  • If one purchases Q-interactive vs Q-Global, would the child's data need to be stored in another location or would it still be uploaded?

    With Q-interactive, you are actually administering the test using the tablet devices. The tablets are serving as your stimulus book, and record form for the WISC-V. Data are transferred and stored via best-in-industry standards for security. These precautions help you with HIPPA and FERPA compliance. 

    When you use Q-global to score the WISC–V, you will still have the paper record form that you will need to store appropriately. Scores would be input into the Q-global system and securely saved there. However, Q-global (for the WISC–V) is only saving raw scores/item score information, not responses as in Q-interactive. Think of Q-global for WISC–V as similar to scoring programs you have used in the past (only this one is web-based with a secure server).

  • When you purchase Q-global scoring, can you access it from any computer connected to the Internet or only one computer in the office? Also, what are the pricing options for the reports?

    Yes, since Q-global is web-based, you may access it using your username and password from any device that is connected to the internet. There are two pricing options available. In addition to a per-report price, there is also an unlimited-use subscription option (1-, 3-, and 5-year subscriptions). Please visit PearsonClinical.com/WISCV for pricing. 

Pricing & Ordering

For information about Q-interactive pricing, please visit HelloQ.com/home or get a personalized quote.

Q-global Unlimited-use Scoring Subscriptions now available!

Two pricing options are now available for WISC-V scoring and reporting on Q-global. In addition to the current per-report price of $2.00, there is now an unlimited-use scoring and reporting subscription available at the following prices:

  • 1-year subscription - $35
  • 3-year subscription - $99
  • 5-year subscription - $149

Important note: Each subscription is per user for the WISC-V only and will begin on the date of order processing unless otherwise requested.

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    Includes: Administration and Scoring Manual, Technical and Interpretive Manual, Stimulus Books 1-3, 25 Record Forms, 25 Response Booklets #1, 25 Response Booklets #2, Symbol Search Scoring Key, Coding Scoring Key, Cancellation Scoring Template, and Wechsler Standard Block Design Set, all in a soft bag

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    Includes: Administration and Scoring Manual, Technical and Interpretive Manual, Stimulus Books 1-3, 25 Record Forms, 25 Response Booklets #1, 25 Response Booklets #2, Symbol Search Scoring Key, Coding Scoring Key, Cancellation Scoring Template, and Wechsler Standard Block Design Set, all in a hard case

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  • WISC-V Scoring with Score Report 1-Year Subscription
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  • WISC-V Complete Kit
    0158978447
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    Includes: Administration and Scoring Manual, Technical and Interpretive Manual, Stimulus Books 1-3, 25 Record Forms, 25 Response Booklets #1, 25 Response Booklets #2, Symbol Search Scoring Key, Coding Scoring Key, Cancellation Scoring Template, and Wechsler Standard Block Design Set
  • WISC-V Complete Kit - Soft Bag
    0158978455
    $1,205.00
     

    Includes: Administration and Scoring Manual, Technical and Interpretive Manual, Stimulus Books 1-3, 25 Record Forms, 25 Response Booklets #1, 25 Response Booklets #2, Symbol Search Scoring Key, Coding Scoring Key, Cancellation Scoring Template, and Wechsler Standard Block Design Set, all in a soft bag

  • WISC-V Complete Kit - Hard Case
    0158978463
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    Includes: Administration and Scoring Manual, Technical and Interpretive Manual, Stimulus Books 1-3, 25 Record Forms, 25 Response Booklets #1, 25 Response Booklets #2, Symbol Search Scoring Key, Coding Scoring Key, Cancellation Scoring Template, and Wechsler Standard Block Design Set, all in a hard case

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  • WISC-V Stimulus Book 1
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